Felis ISSN 2398-2950

Wound: second intention healing

Contributor(s): Andrew Gardiner, Joseph Harari

Introduction

  • Wound healing by epithelialization and contracture.

Uses

  • Significant wound defects usually with contamination.

Advantages

  • Natural process.
  • Granulation tissue contains new capillaries, fibroblasts (producing collagen and inducing contracture).
  • Epithelial edges move forward to reduce defect.
  • Allows elimination of contamination/infection.

Disadvantages

  • Healing is slow.
  • Cosmetic result often poor.
  • Functional result may be seriously impaired by scar tissue, eg over limbs.
  • Increased cost of aftercare/dressings.

Requirements

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Preparation

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Procedure

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Aftercare

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Swaim S F, Hinkle S H, Bradley D M (2001) Wound contraction: basic and clinical factors. Compend Contin Educ 23 (1), 20-34 VetMedResource.
  • Fitch R B, Swaim S F (1995) The role of epithelization in wound healing. Compend Contin Educ 17 (2), 167-177 AGRIS FAO.


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