Felis ISSN 2398-2950

Skin: impression smear

Contributor(s): Catherine Fraser, David Godfrey

Introduction

  • Impression smears can be taken from any moist or greasy skin surface to see  inflammatory, neoplastic or other cellular infiltrates, also to look for acantholytic keratinocytes, bacteria and yeasts.
  • They can also be taken from cut surface of a surgical specimen or post mortem specimen.

Uses

Advantages

  • Samples are easily and quickly taken and will allow immediate differentiation of neoplastic and infective disease in many cases.

Disadvantages

  • Surface bacteria may not be causative as lesions may be contaminated.  
  • Although most neoplastic lesions will exfoliate cells, some (eg sarcoma Sarcoma) will not, so results may be erroneously negative.

Requirements

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Preparation

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Procedure

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Outcomes

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

Other sources of information

  • Miller W H, Griffin C E & Campbell (2013) Muller & Kirk's Small Animal Dermatology 7th edn. Elsevier Inc, Missouri, pp 81-86.
  • Villiers E & Blackwood L (2005) Canine and Feline Clinical Pathology. BSAVA 2nd edn. 


ADDED