Felis ISSN 2398-2950

Radiography: scapula

Contributor(s): Patsy Whelehan

Introduction

  • Conditions affecting the scapula are comparatively rare, but when radiography is necessary, it is not an easy area to show effectively.
  • If general anesthesia is not used, then heavy sedation with analgesia is needed, in respect of the craniocaudal projection.
  • The film must include the whole bone, must be correctly exposed and developed and free from movement blur and artifact.
  • The anatomical marker must be clearly visible, along with the patient's identification, the date, and the name of the hospital or practice.

Uses

Advantages

  • Non-invasive.

Requirements

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Preparation

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Procedure

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers


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