Felis ISSN 2398-2950

Radiography: pelvis

Contributor(s): Patsy Whelehan

Introduction

  • Attention to detail in radiographing the pelvis is important, as high standards of positioning are vital for accurate radiological assessment.
  • A good supply of the appropriate positioning aids is needed.
  • It is particularly important that the patient is highly compliant. General Anesthesia or heavy sedation with analgesia is required.
  • The image should include the whole pelvis, the proximal femora, and the soft tissues surrounding the femora, as any muscle wastage should be noted.
  • The film should be checked for correct positioning, exposure and processing and should be free from movement blur and artifact.
  • The anatomical marker must be clearly visible, along with the patient's identification, the date, and the name of the hospital or practice.

Uses

  • Fractures of the pelvis Fracture: overview  Pelvis: fracture 05 - radiograph VD .
  • Fractures of the proximal femur Fracture: femur 03 comminuted proximal - radiograph CrCd  Femur: fracture (proximal third) - radiograph  Femur: pathological neck fracture - radiograph VD .
  • Dislocation of the coxofemoral joint Hip: slipped epiphysis - radiograph lateral  Hip: slipped epiphysis - radiograph VD (compare with normal  ).
  • Neoplastic disease.
  • Hip dysplasia (occasionally seen) Hip: dysplasia.

Advantages

  • Non-invasive.
  • Straightforward.

Requirements

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Preparation

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Procedure

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Keller G G, Reed A L, Lattimer J C et al (1999) Hip dysplasia - a feline population study. Vet Radiol Ultrasound 40 (5), 460-464 PubMed.


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