Felis ISSN 2398-2950

Preoxygenation

Contributor(s): Graham Bilbrough, Sheilah Robertson

Introduction

  • Administration of 100% oxygen before induction of anesthesia prolongs the time to onset of arterial hypoxemia Hypoxemia. This technique increases the bodys oxygen stores, primarily in the functional residual capacity (FRC) of the lungs.
  • In humans preoxygenation can be achieved with normal tidal volume breathing for 3-5 minutes or by 4-8 voluntary deep breaths. In animals only the normal breathing strategy while 100% oxygen is administered can be used.

Uses

  • Used prior to induction of anesthesia Anesthetic induction: overview in animals that are at high risk for oxygen desaturation; this includes obese animals, pregnant animals, critically ill animals and when a difficult intubation is anticipated, eg brachycephalic breeds of dog or in animals that have sustained facial trauma. Any animal with respiratory compromise may have a compromised FRC and benefit from preoxygenation.This technique can also be used when intubation Nasoesophageal intubation will not be performed immediately after induction of anesthesia, eg when a laryngeal examination is required, or bronchoscopy or bronchiolar lavage will be performed.

Advantages

  • Easily performed technique, can prevent severe complications during induction and intubation, requires simple equipment.

Disadvantages

  • Some animals may resent the placement of a mask over their face and struggle making the procedure impossible. In addition struggling will increase the oxygen demand of the animal canceling any potential benefits. This procedure delays the start of anesthesia and the planned procedure so the pros and cons need to be considered and weighed up against each other.

Requirements

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Preparation

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Procedure

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Aftercare

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Outcomes

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references fromPubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Dixon B J, Dixon J B, Carden J R et al (2005) Preoxygenation is more effective in the 25 degrees head-up position than in the supine position in severely obese patients: a randomized controlled study. Anesthesiology 102 (6), 1110-1115, discussion 5A PubMed.
  • Mort T C (2005) Preoxygenation in critically ill patients requiring emergency tracheal  intubation. Crit Care Med 33 (11), 2672-2675 PubMed.
  • Chiron B, Laffon M, Ferrandiere M et al (2004) Standard preoxygenation technique versus two rapid techniques in pregnant patients. Int J Obstet Anesth 13 (1), 11-14 PubMed.
  • Pandit J J, Duncan T, Robbins P A (2003) Total oxygen uptake with two maximal  breathing techniques and the tidal volume breathing technique: a physiologic study of preoxygenation. Anesthesiology 99 (4), 841-846 PubMed.
  • Baraka A S, Taha S K, Aouad M T et al (1999) Preoxygenation: comparison of maximal breathing and tidal volume breathing techniques. Anesthesiology 91 (3), 612-616 PubMed.


ADDED