Felis ISSN 2398-2950

Peritoneal fluid: chyle

Contributor(s): Vetstream Ltd

Overview

  • Identification of chyle is based on gross appearance, cytology Peritoneal fluid: cytology and presence of lipids.
  • Cause may be traumatic, tumors or obstructions causing rupture or obstruction of intestinal lacteals.

Sampling

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Tests

Methodologies

  • Gross color, turbidity.
  • Measurement of cholesterol Blood biochemistry: cholesterol and triglyceride in effusion and plasma.
  • Cell count/cytology.
  • Sudan stain for lipid.
  • Ether extraction.
  • Overnight refrigeration.

Availability

  • Standard.

Validity

Sensitivity

  • Differential cell count not always useful in recognizing chyle since lymphocytes are not always the predominant cell and some chylous effusions are dominated by neutophils and/or macrophages.

Specificity

  • Measurement of cholesterol and triglyceride levels most accurate way of recognizing chyle.
  • Not all chylous effusions are milky white and may appear serosanguinous.
  • Ether extraction test unreliable.
  • Do not always see fat globules after staining with Sudan III.

Technique (intrinsic) limitations

  • Cannot distinguish pseudochylous effusion if do not perform cholesterol and triglyceride measurement.

Result Data

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

Other sources of information

  • Cowell R L, Tyler R D and Meinkoth J H (1989) Abdominal and thoracic fluid. In: Diagnostic Cytology of the Dog and Cat. Eds Cowell and Tyler American Veterinary Publications Inc. 1st edn. pp 163-165.


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