Felis ISSN 2398-2950

Therapeutics: allergy management

Synonym(s): Feline Atopic Syndrome (FAS) – Aeroallergen Allergy ± Cutaneous Adverse Food Reactions (± Asthma)

Contributor(s): Didier N Carlotti, Alison Diesel, Rosanna Marsella, Charlie Walker

Threshold of pruritus

  • A given individual can tolerate a variety of stimuli without developing clinical signs as long as the threshold is not reached.
  • All these stimuli have an additive effect and once the threshold is reached itching occurs.
  • Pruritic threshold varies from individual to individual and can be lowered by stress.
  • Allergic cats may present with combination of allergies and secondary skin infections, eg superficial bacterial pyoderma. It is unlikely that Malassezia dermatitis is a contributing factor to pruritus.
  • A small percentage of cats with environmental allergies may also have a component of food sensitivity contributing to their pruritus.
  • Identification and control of concurrent allergies and uncommon secondary infections is crucial in the management of cats with chronic allergies.
  • Complicating bacterial infections are often overlooked in cats.

Principles of therapy

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Treatment of acute flares of FAS

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Treatment of chronic FAS

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Maina E, Fontaine J (2019) Use of maropitant for the control of pruritus in non-flea, nonfood-induced feline hypersensitivity dermatitis: an open label uncontrolled pilot study. J Feline Med Surg 21, 967-972 PubMed
  • Noli C, Matricoti I, Schievano C (2019) A double-blinded, randomized, methyl-prednisolone-controlled study on the efficacy of oclacitinib in the management of pruritus in cats with non-flea non-food-induced hypersensitivity dermatitis. Vet Dermatol 30, 110–e30 PubMed
  • Noli C, Miolo A, Medori C, Schievano C (2019) Effect of dietary supplementation with ultramicronized palmitoylethanolamide in maintaining remission in cats with nonflea hypersensitivity dermatitis: a double-blind, multicentre, randomized, placebo-controlled study. Vet Dermatol 30, 387- e117 PubMed.
  • Meason-Smith C, Diesel A, Patterson A P et al (2017) Characterization of the cutaneous mycobiota in healthy and allergic cats using next generation sequencing. Vet Dermatol 28(1), 71-e17 PubMed.   
  • Older C E, Diesel A, Patterson A P, Meason-Smith C et al (2017) The feline skin microbiota: The bacteria inhabiting the skin of healthy and allergic cats. PLoS One 12(6), e 0178555 PubMed
  • Mueller R S, Olivry T, Prelaud P (2016) Critically appraised topic on adverse food reactions of companion animals (2): common food allergen sources in dogs and cats. BMC Vet Res 12, 9-12 PubMed.  
  • Olivry T, Mueller R S, Prelaud P (2015) Critically appraised topic on adverse food reactions of companion animals (1): duration of elimination diets. BMC Vet Res 11, 225-227 PubMed
  • Ravens P A, Xu B J, Vogelnest L J (2014) Feline atopic dermatitis: a retrospective study of 45 cases (2001–2012). Vet Dermatol 25, 95-e28 PubMed
  • Favrot C (2013) Feline non-flea induced hypersensitivity dermatitis: Clinical features, diagnosis and treatment. J Feline Med Surg 15, 778-784 PubMed.
  • Vogelnest L, Cheng K Y (2013) Cutaneous adverse food reactions in cats: retrospective evaluation of 17 cases in a dermatology referral population (2001–2011). Aust Vet J 91, 443-451 PubMed
  • Wildermuth K, Zabel S, Rosychuk R A W (2013) The efficacy of cetirizine hydrochloride on the pruritus of cats with atopic dermatitis: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Vet Dermatol 24, 576–e138 PubMed
  • Yu H W, Vogelnest L J (2012) Feline superficial pyoderma: a retrospective study of 52 cases (2001–2011). Vet Dermatol 23, 448–e86 PubMed
  • Favrot C, Steffan J, Seewald W et al (2011) Establishment of diagnostic criteria for feline non-flea induced hypersensitivity dermatitis. Vet Dermatol 23, 45-e11 PubMed
  • Hobi S, Linek M, Marignac G, Olivry T, Beco L, Nett C, Fontaine J, Roosje P, Bergvall K, Belova S, Koebrich S, Pin D, Kovalik M, Meury S, Wilhelm S, Favrot C (2011) Clinical characteristics and causes of pruritus in cats: a multicentre study on feline hypersensitivity-associated dermatoses. Vet Dermatol 22, 406-413 PubMed.  
  • Schmidt V, Buckley L M, McEwan N A et al (2011) Efficacy of a 0.0584% hydrocortisone aceponate spray in presumed feline allergic dermatitis: an open label pilot study. Vet Dermatol 23, 11-e4 PubMed
  • Wildermuth B E, Griffin C E, Rosenkrantz (2011) Response of feline eosinophilic plaques and lip ulcers to amoxicillin trihydrate– clavulanate potassium therapy: a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled prospective study. Vet Dermatol 23, 110–e25 PubMed
  • Wisselink M A, Willemse T (2009) The efficacy of ciclosporine A in cats with presumed atopic dermatitis: a double blind, randomised prednisolone-controlled study. Vet J 180, 55-59 PubMed
  • Kadoya-Minegishi M, Park S J, Sekiguchi M et al (2002) The use of fluorescein as a contrast medium to enhance intradermal skin tests in cats. Aust Vet J 11, 702-703 PubMed.  


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