Felis ISSN 2398-2950

Pheromone analogue therapy

Synonym(s): Pheromonatherapy, pheromonotherapy

Contributor(s): Daniel Mills, Lisa Radosta

Introduction

  • Pheromone analogue therapy describes the clinical use of chemical analogues of the naturally occurring pheromones produced by animals.
  • Pheromones are species specific and are thus used for intraspecies communication.
  • Pheromones in animals are detected by the vomero-nasal organ in the rostral end of the hard palate. In order to direct chemicals into this structure, the animal may need to engage in flehman behavior. In cats this resembles panting with the mouth partially open. 
  • Nerves stimulated as a result of pheromones synapse in the limbic structures of the brain where they can directly affect behavior and emotional arousal. Exact mechanism of action remains unknown, but efficacy demonstrated in a range of controlled studies.
  • Chemicals are largely odorless and specific smell is not relevant to activity.
  • Pheromonatherapy in the treatment of behavior problems is not considered a veterinary procedure by law.

Current formulations (Ceva Animal Health Ltd)

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Indications

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Advantages of pheromonatherapay

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Treatment

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Cozzi A, Lecuelle C L, Monneret P et al (2013) Induction of scratching behaviour in cats: efficacy of synthetic feline interdigital semiochemical.​ J Fel Med Surg 15 (10), 872-878 PubMed.
  • Mills D (2005) Pheromonatherapy: theory and applications. In Practice 27 (7), 368-373 VetMedResource.
  • Pageat P, Gaultier E (2003) Current research in canine and feline pheromones. Vet Clin North Am (Small Anim Pract) 33 (2), 187-212 PubMed.
  • Mills D S (2002) Pheromonatherapy: an integral part of modern companion animal practice. UK Vet (2), 61-63 SemanticScholar.

Other sources of information


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