Felis ISSN 2398-2950

Trachea: stenosis

Contributor(s): Andrew Gardiner, Philip K Nicholls, Elizabeth Rozanski

Introduction

  • Rarely congenital, usually acquired by trauma, eg laceration by intubation, penetrating wounds, scarring after tracheotomy Tracheostomy, temporary tracheostomy, or following other tracheal surgery.
  • Signs: dyspnea and cough, respiratory stridor.
  • Diagnosis: auscultation, palpation, plain radiography, endoscopy (with great care).
  • Treatment: minor stenoses by bougeniage using open bronchoscopes; more severe or recurrent lesions by resection and end-to-end anastomosis.
  • Prognosis: some stenosis at repair site is inevitable.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Trauma.
  • Congenital.

Pathophysiology

  • Stenotic lesions of the trachea arise primarily as the result of acquired injuries, eg laceration by intubation, penetrating wounds, scarring after tracheotomy Tracheostomy, temporary tracheostomy or following other tracheal surgery.
  • Rarely, it may arise congenitally.

Timecourse

  • Weeks to months.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Culp W T, Weisse C, Cole S G et al (2007) Intraluminal tracheal stenting for treatment of tracheal narrowing in three cats. Vet Surg 36 (2), 107-113 PubMed.
  • Berg J, Leveille C R, O'Callaghan M W (1991) Treatment of posttraumatic carinal stenosis by balloon dilation during thoracotomy in a cat. JAVMA 198 (6), 1025-1027 PubMed.
  • Corcoran B M (1989) Post traumatic tracheal stenosis in a cat. Vet Rec 124 (13), 342-343 PubMed.


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