Felis ISSN 2398-2950

Testicle: cryptorchid

Contributor(s): Rob Lofstedt

Introduction

  • Cause: heritable failure of normal testicular descent.
  • A variety of possible anomalies.
  • Incidence: rare.
  • Treatment: orchidectomy.
  • Prognosis: significantly increased risk of testicular neoplasia Testis: neoplasia and testicular torsion (intra-abdominal).

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Heritable - possibly autosomal recessive gene.
  • Absent or aberrant gubernacular growth leads to failure of testicular descent.

Pathophysiology

  • Abnormal descent of testicles into scrotum.

Possible anomalies

  • Gubernaculum fails to contract enough to draw the testicle into the scrotum. This results in abdominal, inguinal or para-penile positions of the testicle.
  • Testicle remains in high abdominal position.
  • Mixed intra-abdominal and inguinal outgrowth, some abdominal migration, testicle closer to inguinal canal.
  • Increasing extra-abdominal growth, inguinal or parapenile testicle (more common).
  • Probably more common on LHS.
  • Bilateral/unilateral (more common).

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Prevention

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Yates D, Hayes G, Heffernan M et al (2003) Incidence of cryptorchidism in dogs and cats. Vet Rec 152 (16), 502-504 PubMed.


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