Felis ISSN 2398-2950

Teeth: tumor

Synonym(s): Odontogenic tumor; Feline inductive odontogenic tumor (FIOT, Amyloid-producing odontogenic tumor (APOT

Contributor(s): Rachel Perry

Introduction

  • Odontogenic tumors arise from remnants of embryonic tissues destined to develop teeth, the odontogenic epithelium or odontogenic mesenchyme or a combination. The growths may mimic certain stages of tooth development histologically, containing enamel, dentin or cementum or dental pulp-like tissue.
  • Cause: neoplastic transformation of tissues of dental origin.
  • Signs: expanding oral mass, halitosis, malocclusion.
  • Clinical behavior: hamartoma-like proliferation to benign but invasive neoplasms.
  • Diagnosis: histopathology, radiology.
  • Treatment: wide surgical excision.
  • Prognosis: good with adequate excision.

Pathogenesis

Pathophysiology

  • Odontogenic tumors arise from remnants of embryonic tissuse destined to develop teeth: odontogenic epithelium or odontogenic mesenchyme or a combination.
  • Rare - representing <3% of oral masses.
  • Originally classified according to cell type and presence of "reciprocal inductive properties":
    • During normal tooth development a reciprocal inductive process occurs between odontogenic epithelium and adjacent mesenchyme.
    • Internal enamel epithelium  induces adjacent mesenchymal cells of dental papilla to differentiate into odontoblasts.
    • Odontoblasts form dentin.
    • Dentin induces the internal enamel epithelium to differentiate into ameloblasts and produce enamel.
  • This system, though, is incomplete and confusing because not all odontogenic tumors have inductive properties.
  • Now defined on basis of tissue of origin.
  • Feline inductive odontogenic tumor (FIOT) develops from epithelial and mesenchymal elements; grows expansively and locally invasive. Metastasis not reported.
  • Feline ameloblastoma composed of proliferating epithelium - no inductive properties. Two histologic variants: follicular or keratinizing pattern.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Beatty J A, Charles J A, Malik R et al (2000) Feline inductive odontogenic tumour in a Burmese cat. Aust Vet J 78 (7), 452-455 PubMed.
  • Moore A S, Wood C A, Engler S J et al (2000) Radiation therapy for long-term control of odontogenic tumours and epulis in three cats. J Fel Med Surg (1), 57-60 PubMed.
  • Gardner D G (1998) Ameloblastomas in cats: a critical evaluation of the literature and the addition of one example. J Oral Pathol Med 27 (1), 39-42 PubMed.
  • Gardner D G, Dubielzig R R (1995) Feline inductive odontogenic tumor (inductive fibroameloblastoma) - a tumor unique to cats. J Oral Pathol Med 24 (4), 185-190 PubMed.
  • Breuer W, Geisel O, Linke R P et al (1994) Light microscopic, ultastructural, and immunohistochemical examinations of two calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors (CEOT) in a dog and a cat. Vet Pathol 31 (4), 415-420 PubMed.
  • Gardner D G, Dubielzig R R, McGee E V (1994) The so-called calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour in dogs and cats (amyloid-producing odontogenic tumour). J Comp Pathol 111 (3), 221-230 PubMed.
  • Stebbins K E, Morse C C, Goldschmidt M H (1989) Feline oral neoplasia: a ten-year survey. Vet Pathol 26 (2), 121-128 PubMed.


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