Felis ISSN 2398-2950

Shoulder: luxation - traumatic

Contributor(s): James Cook,

Introduction

  • Uncommon; usually medial, can also be lateral.
  • Cause: moderate to severe trauma.
  • Acute onset, severe (usually non-weight bearing) forelimb lameness, typical posture.
  • Often reduces spontaneously on manipulation.
  • Diagnosis: history, signs, radiography.
  • Treatment: dependent on direction of luxation/concurrent injury/whether recurrent.
  • Prognosis: good following early surgical treatment.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Moderate to severe trauma: fall or blunt trauma, especially when turning at speed.

Specific

  • Rupture of glenohumeral ligament(s) - loss of cranial support allows cranial luxation.

Pathophysiology

  • Generally medial luxation of scapulo-humeral joint caused by moderate to severe trauma, can also be lateral.
  • Usually medial or lateral luxation caused by trauma to joint.
  • Rarely cranial (may be associated with loss of cranial joint support with rupture of glenohumeral ligament(s)) or caudal.
  • Concurrent injuries always possible, eg fracture, brachial plexus involvement (especially lateral luxations).

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers


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