ISSN 2398-2950      

Retained temporary teeth (Persistent primary teeth)

ffelis
Contributor(s):

David Crossley


Introduction

  • Temporary tooth remaining after eruption of permanent tooth, canines and incisors most commonly affected.
  • If not removed, affect direction of eruption of permanent tooth causing malocclusions and gingivitis.
  • Mandibular canines: permanent tooth erupts medial to temporary. Retention of temporary mandibular canines causes permanent tooth to tip laterally and impinge on hard palate/gingiva/other teeth causing pain on closure of mouth.
  • Maxillary canines: permanent tooth erupts rostral to temporary. Retention of temporary maxillary canines permanent tooth erupts into space for mandibular canine when mouth closed. May result in:
    • Impaction of mandibular or maxillary canine.
    • Maxillary lateral incisor and/or canine pushed laterally by mandibular canine (often with impaction of mandibular canine).
    • Mandibular canine pushed medial relative to maxillary canine impinging on hard palate.
  • Incisors: permanent tooth erupts caudal to temporary - retention may affect scissor bite resulting in local soft tissue trauma.
  • Treatment: extraction under general anesthesia.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Hereditary.

Predisposing factors

General

  • Hereditary predisposition to retention of temporary teeth.

Pathophysiology

  • Retention of temporary tooth alters direction of eruption of permanent tooth   →   malocclusion Dental malocclusion.
  • Retention of plaque between permanent and temporary tooth   →   localized gingivitis and periodontitis.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

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