Felis ISSN 2398-2950

Periocular dermatitis

Contributor(s): Dennis E Brooks, Ian Mason, David Williams

Introduction

  • Cause: commonly due to parasitic conditions or allergies. May be secondary to ocular irritation or an aspect of generalized seborrhea.
  • Signs: erythema and inflammation of periocular tissues   →   pruritus   →   self trauma.
  • Diagnosis: history, signs, skin scraping, mycology, intradermal, skin testing, hypoallergenic exclusion diet.
  • Treatment: elimination of underlying cause.
  • Prognosis: generally good, depends on immune status and etiology.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

Fungal

Allergic

Environmental

  • UV light in cats with non-pigmented periocular tissue.

Seborrheic

Secondary to ocular irritation

Predisposing factors

General

  • In contact with affected animal (parasites, dermatophytosis).

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

Other sources of information

  • Petersen-Jones S & Crispin S (2002) BSAVA Manual of Small Animal Ophthalmology. 2nd edn. British Small Animal Veterinary Association. ISBN 0 905214 54 4


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