Felis ISSN 2398-2950

Pediculosis

Synonym(s): Felicola subrostratus infestation

Contributor(s): Flemming Kristensen, Rosanna Marsella, David Scarff

Introduction

  • Cause: infestation with biting louse Felicola subrostratus associated with poor husbandry.
  • Signs: pruritus, scale.
  • Treatment: most antiparasitic agents are effective.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Felicola subrostratus (biting louse) Felicola subrostratus.
  • Species specific.
  • Eggs are firmly attached to hair shaft along almost their whole length. Contrast with Cheyletiella whose eggs are attached at one pole only.
  • Obligate parasite throughout life cycle.
  • No sucking louse parasitizes the cat.

Predisposing factors

General

  • Poor husbandry.
  • Debilitation/old age.
  • Neonatal/young.
  • Both above due to poor grooming techniques.

Pathophysiology

  • Lice produce few clinical lesions but the associated biting and scratching may produce severe excoriation.
  • Felicola subrostratus (biting louse) feeds on skin surface  →  scale and alopecia.

Epidemiology

  • Obligate parasites, eggs cemented to hair shaft.
  • Transmitted by direct contact and fomites.
  • Species specific.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Prevention

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Grant D I (1985) Notes on parasitic skin disease in the dog and cat. Br Vet J 141 (5), 447-462 PubMed.
  • Hewitt M & Lim K B (1981) The therapy of parasitic skin infestations. Clin Exp Dermatol (5), 527-531 PubMed.


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