Felis ISSN 2398-2950

Neotrombicula autumnalis infestation

Synonym(s): Harvest mite infestation, Trombicula infestation

Contributor(s): Rosanna Marsella, Ian Mason, David Scarff

Introduction

  • Cause: larvae of Neotrombicula autumnalis  Neotrombicula autumnalis.
  • Signs: facial and pedal pruritus in summer and autumn; orange mites seen with naked eye.
  • Treatment: many antiparasitic agents effective.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • In sensitized individuals there is a hypersensitivity reaction   →   pruritus and self-excoriation.

Predisposing factors

General

  • Outdoor cats which hunt in wooded or grassland areas.

Pathophysiology

  • Larvae parasitize mammalian host   →   local irritation/hypersensitivity .

Timecourse

  • Signs seen seasonally from July to October in Britain.

Epidemiology

  • Neotrombicula autumnalis is a trombiculid mite the adults and nymphs of which are free living Lifecycle: Neotrombicula autumnalis - diagram .
  • Adults live in decaying organic matter in the soil.
  • They are most common on chalky or sandy soil and dislike clay.
  • Parasitic 6 legged larvae are most numerous in the late summer and autumn.
  • Larval mites attach to host skin, dissolving the cuticle with saliva and suck up host tissue fluids.
  • The pinnae, principally Henri's pocket, are a particularly favored area of attachment, as are interdigital webs.
  • Mites detach on molting to the nymphal stage.
  • The complete life cycle takes 50-70 days Lifecycle: Neotrombicula autumnalis - diagram .

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Prevention

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • White B (2001) Early Trombicula autumnalis infection. Vet Rec 148 (6), 188 PubMed.
  • Hardison J L (1977) A case of Eutrombicula alfreddugesi (chiggers) in a cat. Vet Med Small Anim Clin 72 (1), 47 PubMed.


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