Felis ISSN 2398-2950

Femur: fracture

Contributor(s): Laura Owen, Rob Pettitt

Introduction

  • Cause: fractures of the feline femur occur predominantly as a result of major trauma, usually a road traffic accident or fall from a height.
  • Signs: acute onset, non-weight bearing hindlimb lameness is the most common presentation.
  • Fractures can be divided into three main regions:
    • Fractures of the head/neck/greater trochanter.
    • Diaphyseal fractures.
    • Distal physeal fractures.
  • Treatment: surgical treatment is recommended in the majority of cases.
  • Prognosis: when managed appropriately and promptly the prognosis for femoral fractures is good.

Diagnosis

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Treatment

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Outcomes

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

Other sources of information

  • Scott H W, McLaughlin R (2007) Fractures and disorders of the hindlimb. In: Scott H W, McLaughlin R (eds) Feline Orthopaedics. London. Manson Publishing Limited. pp 167-260.
  • Harari J (2002) Treatments for feline long bone fractures. Vet Clin N Am Small Anim Pract 32 (4), 927-47 PubMed.


ADDED