Felis ISSN 2398-2950

Alopecia universalis

Contributor(s): Ian Mason, David Scarff

Introduction

  • Cause: rare congenital disorder of hair follicles specifically created by breeding programs.
  • Signs: decreased or absent hair coat from birth in Sphinx (Canadian hairless) cat.
  • Diagnosis: clinical signs +/- skin biopsy.
  • Treatment: antiseborrhoic shampoos.
  • Prognosis: good, but lifelong treatment required.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Genetic.

Pathophysiology

  • Congenital non-color-linked hair loss.
  • Genetic coding   →   hair follicles absent or hypoplastic and decreased in number + sebaceous glands open directly onto skin surface   →   hairless and oily skin from birth.

Timecourse

  • Lifelong.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Godfrey D R (1998) A case of feline paraneoplastic alopecia with secondary Malassezia-associated dermatitis. JSAP 39 (8), 394-396 PubMed.
  • Rhodes K H (1990) Cutaneous manifestations of canine and feline endocrinopathies. Probl Vet Med (4), 617-626 PubMed.
  • Foil C S (1988) Differential diagnosis of feline pruritus. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract 18 (5), 999-1011 PubMed.
  • Robinson R (1973) The Canadian hairless of Sphinx cat. Journal of Heredity 64 (1), 47-9 PubMed.


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