ISSN 2398-2950      

Skin: cheyletiellosis

ffelis

Synonym(s): Walking dandruff


Introduction

  • Cause: infestation with Cheyletiella blakeiC. yasguri  Cheyletiella yasguri  (dog) or C. parasitivorax (rabbit).
  • Signs: variable, absent to intense pruritus with scaling; in humans erythematous papules, intensely pruritic.
  • Diagnosis: identification of mite or its eggs.
  • Treatment: ectoparasiticides.
  • Prognosis: excellent.
    Print off the owner factsheet on 'Walking dandruff' (Cheyletiellosis) 'Walking dandruff' (Cheyletiellosis) to give to your client.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Three species, none are host specific, but each more closely associated with one species:
    • Cheyletiella yasguri  Cheyletiella yasguri  - associated with dog.
    • C. parasitivorax - rabbit.
    • C. blakei - cat.

Predisposing factors

General

  • Cattery or multipet household.

Pathophysiology

  • Mites live in keratin layer (not hair follicles) and move about in pseudotunnels in epidermal debris  →  feed periodically by attaching to epidermis, inserting stylet and engorging  →  inflammation  →  scaling.
  • Normal grooming  →  removes scale and mites and eggs  →  minimizes signs.
  • Persistent infection  →  scale and intensity of pruritus increases  →  some animals develop hypersensitivity  →  exfoliative erythroderma + severe pruritus.
  • Some cases  →  widespread papulocrustous eruption.

Timecourse

  • Variable.

Epidemiology

  • Entire lifecycle  Lifecycle: Cheyletiella yasguri - diagram (21 d) on the one host.
  • Eggs laid on hair shaft - lost hair is a source of reinfestation.
  • Adult female can survive off host for up to 10 days.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Prevention

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Pagé N, de Jaham C & Paradis M (2000) Observations on topical ivermectin in the treatment of otoacariosis, cheyletiella and toxocariosis in cats. Can Vet J 41 (10), 773-776 PubMed.
  • Wagner R & Stallmeister N (2000) Cheyletiella dermatitis in humans, dogs and cats. Br J Dermatol 143 (5), 1110-1112 PubMed.
  • Rivers J K, Martin J, Pukay B (1986) Walking dandruff and Cheyletiella dermatitis. J Am Acad Dermatol 15 (5 Part 2), 1130-1133 PubMed.
  • Cohen S R (1980) Cheyletiella dermatitis. A mite infestation of rabbit, cat, dog, and man. Arch Dermatol 116 (4), 435-437 PubMed.
  • McKeever P J, Allen S K (1979) Dermatitis associated with Cheyletiella infestation in cats. JAVMA 174 (7), 718-720 PubMed.
  • Fox J G & Hewes K (1976) Cheyletiella infestation in cats. JAVMA 169 (3), 332-333 PubMed.


    Other sources of information

  • Miller W H Jr, Griffin C E & Campbell KL (2013) Cheyletiellosis. In: Muller and Kirk's Small Animal Dermatology. 7th editionW B Saunders, Philadelphia. pp 300-303.

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