Felis ISSN 2398-2950

Borna virus infection: Non-suppurative meningoencephalitis

Contributor(s): Peter Dickinson, Simon Platt

Introduction

  • Rare; unknown actual incidence.
  • Cause: Borna disease virus. However, it is possible to get very similar clinical and clinicopathologic symptoms with other diseases, some of which may still have to be classified.
  • Signs: often rural cat over 6 months of age with progressive pelvic limb ataxia and weakness
  • Diagnosis: cytopathology, serology.
  • Treatment: supportive.
  • Prognosis: guarded.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

Pathophysiology

  • Not completely understood.
  • Ultimately causes a non-suppurative meningoencephalomyelitis.
  • Inflammation is predominantly located in the gray matter of the CNS.
  • Causes axonal degeneration and loss of myelin in brain and in cord.
  • Cerebellar meningitis is usually a prominent feature of the disease.
  • Outside of the CNS, lesions are either non-existent or minimal.

Timecourse

  • Progress of signs is usually subacute to chronic lasting 1-4 weeks.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Lutz H, Addie D D, Boucraut-Baralon C et al (2015) Borna disease virus infection in cats: ABCD guidelines on prevention and management. J Feline Med Surg 17 (7), 614-616 PubMed.
  • Helps C R, Turan N, Bilal T et al (2002) Detection of antibodies to Borna disease virus in Turkish cats by using recombinant p40. Vet Rec 149 (21), 647-650 PubMed.
  • Nowotny N (1999) Borna disease in cats. Vet Rec 144 (7), 187 PubMed.
  • Nowotny N & Weissenb√∂ck H (1995) Description of feline nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis ("Staggering disease") and studies on its etiology. J Clin Microbiol 33 (6), 1668-1669 PubMed

Other sources of information

  • Berg A L (2000) Borna disease in cats. In: Current Vet Therapy: Small Anim Pract XIII Philadelphia:W B Saunders pp 976-978.


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