Felis ISSN 2398-2950

Phaeohyphomycosis

Contributor(s): Susan Dawson, Alan Radford

Introduction

Classification

Taxonomy

  • Genera: Deuteromycetes.
  • Over a hundred species so far associated with phaeohyphomycosis in humans and animals.

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Clinical Effects

Epidemiology

Habitat

  • Ubiquitous in the environment.
  • Saprophytic soil fungi.

Transmission

  • Implanted by trauma.
  • More rarely by inhalation.

Pathological effects

  • Immunosuppressed cats more severely affected.
  • Cutaneous or subcutaneous lesions.
  • Nodules - often on the face or limbs - can be ulcerated with draining tracts.
  • Fungal pigmentation may be evident in affected tissues.
  • Also cerebral involvement associated with abcessation.
  • More generalized systemic disease may also occur.

Control

Control via animal

  • Prognosis in CNS disease and generalized systemic disease is poor.

Control via chemotherapies

Other countermeasures

  • Surgical excision.

Diagnosis

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from VetMedResource and PubMed.
  • Lloret A, Hartmann K, Pennisi M G et al (2015) Rare opportunistic mycoses in cats: phaeohyphomycosis and hyalohyphomycosis: ABCD guidelines on prevention and management. J Feline Med Surg 15(7), 628-630 PubMed.
  • Mariani C L (2002) Cerebral phaeohyphomycosis caused by Cladosporium spp. in two domestic shorthair catsJ Am Anim Hosp Assoc 38(3), 225-230.
  • McKay J S, Cox C L & Foster A P (2001) Cutaneous alternariosis in a catJ Small Anim Pract 42(2), 75-78.

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