ISSN 2398-2985      

Transtracheal wash

Jreptile

Introduction

  • In reptiles, microbiology and cytology specimens may be collected from the lungs in a manner similar to that used for mammals.
  • This article describes the transoral/transglottal tracheal wash technique.
Transtracheal wash procedures are should only be performed in reptiles that are not critically compromised.

Uses

  • To collect samples for cytological examination.
  • To collect samples for microbiology.

Advantages

  • Simple procedure.
  • Does not require general anesthesia in some cases therefore avoids risk of anesthesia in animals with respiratory compromise.
  • Avoids oropharyngeal sample contamination.
    Oxygen may be administered by facemask during procedure in severely compromised animals.

Disadvantages

  • Sampling is usually blind. Material can be sampled more accurately with endoscopic guidance and this gives better results than blind sampling.
  • More risk of sample contamination from upper respiratory tract, ie trachea, than with bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL).

Requirements

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to obtain ten tokens to view any ten Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds or videos, or Login

Preparation

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to obtain ten tokens to view any ten Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds or videos, or Login

Procedure

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to obtain ten tokens to view any ten Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds or videos, or Login

Aftercare

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to obtain ten tokens to view any ten Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds or videos, or Login

Outcomes

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to obtain ten tokens to view any ten Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds or videos, or Login

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Lafortune M et al (2005) Respiratory bronchoscopy of subadult American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) and tracheal wash evaluation. J Zoo Wildl Med 36 (1), 12-20 PubMed.
  • Johnson J H (2004) Husbandry and medicine of aquatic reptiles. Semin Avian Exotic Pet Med 13 (4), 223-228 VetMedResource.

Other sources of information

  • Wilson B (2017) Lizards. In: Exotic Animal Medicine for the Veterinary Technician. 3rd edn. Eds: Ballard B & Cheek R. Wiley-Blackwell, USA. pp 95-135.
  • Campbell T W (2015) Cytology Sampling Techniques and Evaluation. In: Exotic Animal Hematology and Cytology. 4th edn. Wiley-Blackwell, USA. pp 345-356.
  • Murray M J (2006) Pneumonia and Normal Respiratory Function. In: Reptile Medicine and Surgery. 2nd edn. Ed: Mader D R. Saunders-Elsevier, USA. pp 865-877.
  • Paré J A, Sigler L, Rosenthal K L & Mader D R (2006) Microbiology: Fungal and Bacterial Diseases of Reptiles. In: Reptile Medicine and Surgery. 2nd edn. Ed: Mader D R. Saunders-Elsevier, USA. pp 217-238.
Reproduced with permission from Bonnie Ballard & Ryan Cheek: Exotic Animal Medicine for the Veterinary Technician © 2017, and Bonnie Ballard & Ryan Cheek: Exotic Animal Medicine for the Veterinary Technician © 2017, published by John Wiley & Sons.

Can’t find what you’re looking for?

We have an ever growing content library on Vetlexicon so if you ever find we haven't covered something that you need please fill in the form below and let us know!

 
 
 
 

To show you are not a Bot please can you enter the number showing adjacent to this field

 Security code