ISSN 2398-2985      

Lizard ingestive behavior

Jreptile

Introduction

  • Lizards may be herbivores, carnivores, or omnivores, and can be specialized or opportunistic.
  • Less than 1% of all lizard species are herbivorous, and only about 11% are omnivorous.
  • Some carnivorous lizards thrive on a single type of invertebrate prey, eg ants, while others eat an array of different vertebrates and invertebrates.
  • Active foragers are often specialists and more sedentary reptiles often eat a greater variety of food items.
  • Some ‘sit-and-wait’ predators use parts of their body to lure prey, eg the legless lizard (Lialis burtonis; Pygopodidae), attracts small frogs and lizards by waving or twitching its tail.
  • Foraging style is associated with many traits including movement rate, movement frequency, sensory mode, types of prey, body form, crypsis, skin toxins, predators, daily energy expenditure, endurance and fecundity.

Dietary preference

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Commercially formulated diets

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Gastrointestinal system

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Sensory cues

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Nutrition related problems

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

Other sources of information

  • Gibbons P M & Mohan-Gibbons H (2010) Lizards. In: Behavior of Exotis Pets. Ed: Tynes V V. Wiley-Blackwell. pp 44-56.
Reproduced with permission from Valerie V Tynes: Behavior of Exotic Pets © 2010, published by John Wiley & Sons.

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