ISSN 2398-2985      

Fluid therapy

Jreptile

Introduction

  • The aim of fluid therapy during hypovolemic shock is to rehydrate the patient, increase blood volume and/or provide cardiovascular stabilization through restoring normal osmolality for the patient.
  • Reptiles are able to withstand blood loss better than mammals. A rapid shift of fluid from the interstitial to the vascular space takes place during hemorrhage.
  • Fluid administration during anesthesia helps supports the circulation and maintain a stable blood pressure.
  • All fluids need to be warmed to the species’ mid-preferred optimum temperature zone (POTZ).
  • The choice of appropriate fluid type can be difficult in reptiles and depends on the need for fluid therapy.
  • Blood work Hematology including hematocrit (PCV), electrolytes, glucose and total protein will help tailor fluid therapy better.

Administration

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Choice of fluid

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Hypovolemic shock

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Dehydration

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During anesthesia

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed Papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Guzman D S-M, Mitchell M A & Acierno M (2011) Determination of plasma osmolality and agreement between measured and calculated values in captive male Corn Snakes (Pantherophis [Elaphe] guttatus guttatus). J Herpetol Med Surg 21 (1), 16-19 VetMedResource.
  • Dallwig R K, Mitchell M A & Acierno M J (2010) Determination of plasma osmolality and agreement between measured and calculated values in healthy adult Bearded Dragons (Pogona vitticeps). J Herpetol Med Surg 20 (2-3), 69-73 VetMedResource.
  • Martinez-Jimenez D & Hernandez-Divers S J (2007) Emergency care of reptiles. Vet Clin North Am Exot Anim Pract 10 (2), 557-585 PubMed.
  • Stahl Scott J (2003) Diseases of the reptile pancreas. Vet Clin Exotic Anim Pract 6 (1), 191-212 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Pees M & Girling S J (2019) Emergency Care. In: BSAVA Manual of Reptiles. 3rd edn. BSAVA, UK. pp 106-109.
  • Pollock C & Arbona N (2017) Fluid Administration in Reptiles. LafeberVet, USA. Website: www.lafeber.com.
  • Vella D (2013) Reptile & Amphibian Medicine 101. In: Proc World Small Animal Veterinary Association World Congress. Website: www.vin.com.
  • Gibbons P (2009) Critical Care Nutrition and Fluid Therapy in Reptiles. In: Proc 15th Annual International Veterinary Emergency & Critical Care Symposium. pp 91-94.

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