ISSN 2398-2985      

Radiography overview

6guinea pig

Introduction

  • Non-invasive imaging.

Uses

Advantages

  • Radiographic equipment suitable for dogs and cats is suitable for guinea pigs.
  • Radiographs can be taken quickly and relatively inexpensively.
  • Digital x-ray capabilities are becoming the standard and the software greatly enables visualization in small animals.
  • Several textbooks have detailed normal and abnormal pictures of radiographs for reference.
  • Whole body assessments are easily obtained.
  • Skull films in 5 positions are critical for assessing dental health Dental disease.
  • Contrast radiographic techniques used in small animals can be done in guinea pigs.
  • Ability to do a horizontally directed beam allows the guinea pig to remain standing or be in sternal recumbency, with abdominal organs in normal anatomic placement. This is less stressful and can be advantageous in assessing abdominal distension.

Disadvantages

  • Proper restraint is necessary for proper positioning and that usually requires some chemical restraint or anesthesia.
  • Skull/dental films must be done with chemical restraint.
  • Positioning without chemical restraint in the guinea pig may be stressful.
  • In the dyspneic guinea pig, even short-term positioning (lateral or DV or VD) may exacerbate the dyspnea.
Print off the Owner Factsheet on X-ray and Ultrasound to give to your client.

Requirements

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Preparation

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Procedure

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Aftercare

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Outcomes

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Prognosis

  • Depends on the clinical conditions of the guinea pig.

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed Papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Klaphake E (2006) Common rodent procedures. Vet Clin Exot Anim 9 (2), 389-413 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Fischetti A J (2012) Diagnostic Imaging. In: Ferrets, Rabbits and Rodents Clinical Medicine and Surgery. 3rd edn. Eds: Quesenberry K E & Carpenter J W. Elsevier. pp 502-510.
  • Krautwald-Junghanns M-E, Pees M, Reese S et al (2011) Diagnostic Imaging of Exotic Pets. Birds, Small Mammals, Reptiles. Schlutersche.
  • Capello V, Lennox A M & Widmer W R (2008) Clinical Radiology of Exotic Companion Mammals. Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Silverman S & Tell L A (2005) Domestic Guinea Pig (Cavia porcellus). Radiology of Rodents, Rabbits and Rerrets. An Atlas of Normal Anatomy and Positioning. Elsevier Saunders. pp 105-157.

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