ISSN 2398-2985      

Heat stress

6guinea pig

Synonym(s): Heat stroke


Introduction

  • Cause: ambient temperature 21°C/69.8°F or higher, particularly above 28°C/82.4°F
  • Signs: prostration, excess salivation, shallow rapid respiration, death.
  • Diagnosis: elevated body temperature, history.
  • Treatment: controlled cooling of body temperature, fluids (subcutaneous, intraperitoneal).
  • Prognosis: poor.
Print off the Owner factsheets on Common health problemsHeat stress and Summer safety to give to your clients.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Elevated or prolonged ambient temperatures. Usually above 28°C/82.4°F, but effects may be seen as low as 21°C/69.8°F if humidity is elevated particularly in obese, stressed or pregnant guinea pigs.

Predisposing factors

General

  • Obese, stressed, pregnant.

Specific

  • A stressed guinea pig may be one with poor husbandry, nutrition or any concurrent illness or injury.

Pathophysiology

  • Elevated brain temperature, multi-organ dysfunction.

Timecourse

  • Usually takes at least 30 min of high ambient temperature to manifest, but time course for elevated body temperature is variable.

Diagnosis

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to obtain ten tokens to view any ten Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds or videos, or Login

Treatment

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to obtain ten tokens to view any ten Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds or videos, or Login

Prevention

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to obtain ten tokens to view any ten Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds or videos, or Login

Outcomes

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to obtain ten tokens to view any ten Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds or videos, or Login

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

Other sources of information

  • Antinoff N (2011) Heatstroke. In: Blackwell's Five-Minute Veterinary Consult: Small Mammal. Ed: Oglesbee B L. Wiley-Blackwell. pp 265-266.
  • Harkness J E et al (2010) Clinical Signs and Differential Diagnoses. In: Harkness & Wagner's Biology and Medicine of Rabbits and Rodents. 5th edn. Wiley-Blackwell, Ames, IA, USA. pp 195-247.
  • Johnson-Delaney C (2010) Guinea Pigs, Chinchillas, Degus and Duprasi. In: BSAVA Manual of Exotic Pets. 5th edn. Eds: Meredith A & Johnson-Delaney C. British Small Animal Veterinary Association. pp 28-62.
  • Hollamy S (2009) Rodents: Neurological and Musculoskeletal Disorders. In: BSAVA Manual of Rodents and Ferrets. Eds: Keeble E & Meredith A. BSAVA, Quedgely, Gloucester, UK. pp 161-168.

Can’t find what you’re looking for?

We have an ever growing content library on Vetlexicon so if you ever find we haven't covered something that you need please fill in the form below and let us know!

 
 
 
 

To show you are not a Bot please can you enter the number showing adjacent to this field

 Security code