ISSN 2398-2985      

Dermatophytosis

6guinea pig

Synonym(s): Dermatomycosis, Ringworm


Introduction

  • Cause: dermatophyte, most commonly Trichophyton mentagrophytes. New strain Arthroderma benhamiae showing up in United States, Canada.
  • Signs: hair loss, well-demarcated lesions with crusts, erythema, scale, some cases pruritic.
  • Diagnosis: skin scraping with fungal preparation, fungal culture.
  • Treatment: topical and/or systemic.
  • Prognosis: good if underlying immune compromise resolved; guarded if Arthroderma strain.   
Print off the Owner factsheets on RingwormAlopecia, Common health problems, Hospital-associated infections and Skin problems to give to your clients.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Trichophyton mentagrophytes is the most common .
  • Microsporum canis has also been found .
  • Recently a strain causing more persistent disease has emerged from the T. mentagrophytes group: Arthroderma benhamiae Arthroderma benhamiae.

Predisposing factors

General

  • First week after birth through weaning.
  • Stress.
  • High environmental temperatures and humidity.

Specific

  • Immunocompromised, stressed guinea pigs.
  • Skin abrasions or lesions that are open to fungal infection.
  • Pet breeders, shows, pet shop populations.
  • Parturition.

Pathophysiology

  • Infection may cause circumscribed lesions in the epidermis and hair follicles.

Timecourse

  • Usually days or weeks depending on age and immune status.

Epidemiology

  • Direct contact with infected cavies.
  • Direct contact with contaminated housing.
  • Fomite spread by humans handling infected cavies or housing.

Diagnosis

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to obtain ten tokens to view any ten Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds or videos, or Login

Treatment

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to obtain ten tokens to view any ten Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds or videos, or Login

Prevention

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to obtain ten tokens to view any ten Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds or videos, or Login

Outcomes

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to obtain ten tokens to view any ten Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds or videos, or Login

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Fehr M (2015) Zoonotic potential of dermatophytosis in small mammals. J Exotic Pet Med 24 (3), 308-316 ExotPetMed.
  • Nenoff P, Uhrlav S, Kuger C et al (2014) Trichophyton species of Arthroderma benhamiae - a new infectious agent in dermatology. J Deutsche Dermatol Gesellschaft 12 (7), 571-581 PubMed.  
  • Donnelly T M (2000) What's your diagnosis? Mild alopecia and fur loss in a guinea pig. Lab Animal  29 (2), 21-23 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Harkness J E, Turner P V VandeWoude S & Wheler C L (2010) Specific Diseases and Conditions. Dermatophytosis. In: Harkness and Wagner's Biology and Medicine of Rabbits and Rodents. 5th edn. Wiley-Blackwell. pp 287-289.
  • Longley L (2009) Rodents: Dermatoses. In: BSAVA Manual of Rodents and Ferrets. Eds: Keeble E & Meredith A. British Small Animal Veterinary Association. pp 107-122.
  • Percy D H & Barthold S W (2001) Guinea pigs, Mycotic infections. In: Pathology of Laboratory Rodents and Rabbits. 3rd edn. Iowa State University Press, USA. pp 227-228.

Can’t find what you’re looking for?

We have an ever growing content library on Vetlexicon so if you ever find we haven't covered something that you need please fill in the form below and let us know!

 
 
 
 

To show you are not a Bot please can you enter the number showing adjacent to this field

 Security code