ISSN 2398-2977      

Eye: drug administration - subconjunctival injection

pequis
Contributor(s):

Dennis E Brooks


Introduction

  • Another means of attaining high therapeutic levels of drugs in the cornea and anterior segment, particularly in the emergency management of acute infection or inflammation.
  • Placing injections subconjunctivally bypasses the lipid layers of the bulbar conjunctiva and places the drugs adjacent to the water-permeable sclera, increasing water-soluble drug penetration into the eye.
  • Local leakage also allows corneal penetration.

Uses

  • To achieve high corneal and intra-ocular levels of drugs for short periods.
  • Administration of drugs that penetrate the cornea poorly (antibiotics ).
  • Administration of drugs that have slow absorption characteristics (corticosteroids ).
  • When topical medication cannot be administered, or only infrequently.

Advantages

  • Markedly increased penetration of water soluble drugs.
  • Short term high concentrations of drugs in cornea and anterior segment.
  • Supplement to topical therapy.

Disadvantages

  • Local irritation, residues, necrosis and granuloma formation can occur at the site of injection.
  • Once injected the drug(s) cannot be removed.
  • Temporary pain at site of injection.
  • Injection is quite difficult with potential of injury to eye.

Requirements

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Preparation

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Procedure

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Martins B C & Brooks D E (2012) Subconjunctival drug administration in horses. Equine Vet Educ 24 (10), 493-495 WileyOnline.

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