ISSN 2398-2977      

Anesthesia: intravenous (IV)

pequis
Contributor(s):

Kate White

Dennis R Gieser


Introduction

  • Safe controlled and successful anesthesia of the horse is a challenge. Patient temperament coupled with large body mass, thoracoabdominal anatomy and problems related to prolonged periods in dorsal recumbency make anesthesia difficult.
  • Anesthetic drugs cause cardiopulmonary embarrassment and poor muscle blood flow resulting in intra- and post-operative complications.

Aims of IV anesthesia

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Premedication

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IV agents used for anesthetic induction

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Total IV anesthesia (TIVA) techniques

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Umar M A, Yamashita K, Kushiro T & Muir W W (2006) Evaluation of total intravenous anesthesia with propofol or ketamine-medetomidine-propofol combination in horses. JAVMA 228 (8), 1221-1227 PubMed.
  • Luna S P et al (1996) Cardiorespiratory, endocrine and metabolic changes in ponies undergoing intravenous or inhalation anesthesia. J Vet Pharmacol Ther 19 (4), 251-258 PubMed.
  • Taylor P M et al (1995) Total intravenous anesthesia in ponies using detomidine, ketamine, and guaifenesin - pharmacokinetics, cardiopulmonary and endocrine effects. Res Vet Sci 59 (1), 17-23 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Muir W W (1991) Intravenous Anesthetics and Anesthetic techniques in the horse. In: Equine Anesthesia: Monitoring and Emergency Therapy. Eds: Muir W W & Hubbell J A. Mosby Year Book. St Louis 1991 ISBN 0 8016 3576 4.

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