ISSN 2398-2942      

Radiography: pelvis

icanis

Introduction

  • Attention to detail in radiographing the pelvis is important, as high standards of positioning are vital for accurate radiological assessment Radiographic positioning video: lateral pelvis.
  • A secondary radiation grid should be used for larger breed dogs.
  • A good supply of the appropriate positioning aids is needed.
  • It is particularly important that the patient is highly compliant, GA or heavy sedation with analgesia is required.
  • The image should include the whole pelvis, the stifle joints, and the soft tissues surrounding the femora, as any muscle atrophy should be noted.
  • The film should be checked for correct positioning, exposure and processing and should be free from movement blur and artifact.
  • The anatomical marker must be clearly visible, along with the patient's identification, the date, and the name of the hospital or practice.
  • When radiographing the pelvis for an OFA hip dysplasia evaluation, the Kennel Club number, patients AKC or registered name,owners name, hospital or veterinarians name, anatomical marker and date must be exposed on to the film.
  • Lead letters and numbers, an ID camera or X-Rite tape can be used for this, but the latter sometimes does not appear very clearly, particularly where high exposure factors are used.
  • The Penn hip distraction radiograph technique is reported to provide a selection of breeding stock based on a distraction index. It is reported to be the best method of reducing the numbers of dysplastic dogs in a given breeding population.
  • Veterinarians must participate in a Penn hip training course and obtain a Penn hip distraction device to perform and submit films for Penn hip evaluation.

Uses

  • Fractures of the pelvis Pelvis fracture - radiograph VD.
  • Fractures or tumors Bone primary tumor (femur) - radiograph VD of the proximal femur.
  • Aseptic necrosis of the femoral head (Legg Perthes disease) Hip: aseptic femoral head/neck necrosis Hip Perthes disease - radiograph.
  • Dislocation of the coxofemoral joint Hip: luxation.
  • Hip dysplasia diagnosis Hip: dysplasia.
  • Post-operative assessment of hip replacement surgery or triple pelvic osteotomy.
  • Neoplastic disease Pelvis tumor - radiograph.
  • Osteomyelitis Osteomyelitis.
  • Lumbosacral degenerative disease and discospondylitis Diskospondylitis.

Advantages

  • Non-invasive.
  • Equipment readily available.

Disadvantages

  • Patient +/- human exposure to radiation.

Requirements

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Preparation

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Procedure

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Adams W M, Dueland R T, Meinen J et al (1998) Early detection of canine hip dysplasia: comparison of two palpation and five radiographic methods​. JAAHA 34 (4), 339-347 PubMed.
  • Slocum B & Devine T M (1990) Dorsal acetabular rim radiology view for evaluation of the canine hip. JAAHA 26 (3), 289-296 CAB Direct.

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