Canis ISSN: 2398-2942

Cornea: debridement and grid keratotomy

Synonym(s): Grid keratotomy

Contributor(s): Paul Gerding, Natasha Mitchell

Introduction

  • Debriding the corneal epithelium and performing a grid keratotomy promotes healing by:
    • Removing non-vitalized epithelium.
    • Stimulating the release of inflammatory mediators.
    • Providing roughened surface for attachment of new epithelium.

Uses

Disadvantages

  • Risk of puncturing cornea.
  • Risk of inoculating infection deeper into the cornea.
  • Only suitable for SCCED cases Cornea: superficial ulcer 01 - performing the procedure on other types of corneal ulcers is likely to make them worse.

Requirements

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Preparation

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Procedure

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Aftercare

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Outcomes

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Prognosis

  • Usually good, a success rate of 85-90% should be expected with a single adequate epithelial debridement and grid keratotomy.
  • May require repeated debridement if the epithelium fails to adhere to the underlying stroma after two weeks.
  • SCCED lesions that fail to heal after repeated treatments may benefit from a superficial keratectomy Cornea: superficial keratectomy surgery.

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Gosling A A, Labelle A L & Breaux C B (2012) Management of spontaneous chronic corneal epithelial defects (SCCEDs) in dogs with diamond burr debridement and placement of a bandage contact lens. Vet Ophthal 16 (2), 83-88 PubMed.
  • Stanley R G, Hardman C & Johnson B W (1998) Results of grid keratotomy, superficial keratectomy and debridement for the management of persistent corneal erosions in 92 dogs. Vet Ophthal (4), 233-238 PubMed.
  • Morgan R & Abrams K (1994) A comparison of six different therapies for persistent corneal erosions in dogs and cats. Vet Comp Ophthalmol (1), 38-43 VetMedResource.


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