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L-asparaginase

icanis
Contributor(s):

Vetstream Ltd

Synonym(s): Crisantaspase, L-asparagine amidohydrolase


Introduction

Name

  • L-asparaginase.

Class of drug

  • Enzyme (asparagine amidohydrolase).

Description

Chemical name

  • L-asparaginase - enxyme derived from Escherichia coli.
  • Crisantaspase - enzyme derived from Erwinia chrysoanthemi.
  • PEG-asparaginase - enzyme derived from Vibrio succinogenes.

Molecular weight

  • 133,000 daltons.

Physical properties

  • White powder comprising 10,000 iu per vial for reconstitution with 2-5 ml sterile water.

Storage requirements

  • Short shelf-life after reconstitution.

Uses

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Indications

  • Cytotoxic agent:
    • Acute lymphocytic leukemia Acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    • Lymphoma Lymphoma (in combination with other chemotherapies) in doga (although some cats have responded to treatment).
    • Cutaneous histiocytoma (dogs) - multiple lesions only (reported but not a common indication.
    • Granulomatous dermatitis.
    • Mast cell tumors Skin: mastocytoma in dogs.
    • Melanomas in dogs.

Administration

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Precautions

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Interactions

with other drugs

  • Delays clearance of vincristine Vincristine.
  • Terminates the action of methotrexate (in man) possibly by inhibiting protein synthesis.

Adverse Reactions

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

Other sources of information

  • Bishop Y M (1996) Ed The Veterinary Formulary. Handbook of Medicines Used in Veterinary Practice. 3rd edn. London: Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain and British Veterinary Association, pp 334-335. ISBN 0 85369 345 5.
  • Brander G C, Pugh D M, Bywater R J and Jenkins W L (1991) Veterinary Applied Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 5th edn. London: Bailliere Tindall, p 400. ISBN 0 7020 1366 8.
  • Einstein R, Jones R S, Knifton A and Starmer G A (1994) Principles of Veterinary Therapeutics. Harlow: Longman Scientific and Technical, p 538. ISBN 0 582 02963 5.
  • Couto C G and Hammer A S (1994) Oncology. In: The Cat. diseases and Clinical Management. Volume 1. 3rd edn. Ed R G Sherding. New York: Churchill Livingstone, pp 767 and 786. ISBN 0 443 08879 9.
  • Mehta D K (1999) Executive Ed Electronic British National Formulary, Number 33. London: British Medical Association, Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain and Quartet Software Ltd.
  • Hahn K A, Richardson R C (1995) Cancer chemotherapy. A Veterinary Handbook, Williams and Wilkins, Baltimore.
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