Canis ISSN: 2398-2942

Handling dogs: to minimize stress

Contributor(s): Karen Overall, Lisa Radosta

Introduction

  • Most dogs are fearful and/or anxious at the veterinary clinic. Simple changes can make a big difference in the stress level of canine patients resulting in less restraint, less bites and happier patients and clients.
  • Strategies include flexibility in location and structure of the physical examination Reducing stress (visits to practice), type of restraint and judicious use of anti-anxiety medications.

Examining the patient

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Pharmacologic intervention

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed Papers

  • Recent references from VetMed Resource and PubMed.
  • Lind A-K et al (2017) Assessing stress in dogs during a visit to the veterinary clinic: Correlations between dog behavior in standardized tests and assessments by veterinary staff and owners. J Vet Behav Clin Appl Res 17, 24-31.
  • Hammerle M et al (2015) AAHA Canine and Feline Behavior Management Guidelines.  JAAHA 51, 205-221 PubMed Full article.
  • Kuhne F et al (2014) Behavioral and cardiac responses by dogs to physical human-dog contact.  J Vet Behav Clin Appl Res 9, 93-97.
  • Mariti C et al (2012) Perception of dogs’ stress by their owners. J Vet Behav Clin Appl Res 7, 213-219.
  • Döring D et al (2009) Fear-related behaviour of dogs in veterinary practice. Vet J 182, 38-43 PubMed
  • Pizzorusso T (2009) Neuroscience. Erasing fear memories. Science 325, 1214-1215 PubMed

Other sources of information

  • Overall K L (2013) Manual of Clinical Behavioral Medicine for Dogs and Cats. Elsevier.
  • Hernander L (2008) Factors influencing dogs’ stress level in the waiting room at a veterinary clinic.  SLU Student Report 190, pp 29 ISSN 1652-280X. 


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