Canis ISSN: 2398-2942

Chemotherapy: safe handling

Contributor(s): Jane Dobson, Gerry Polton

Indications

General principles

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Individuals 'at risk'

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Managing chemotherapy in practice

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Managing chemotherapy at home

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

Other sources of information

  • Health and Safety Executive. Safe Handling of Cytotoxic Drugs. Sept 2003 http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/misc615.pdf
  • Health and Safety Executive. Working with substances hazardous to health. Jun 2009 http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/indg136.pdf
  • Control of Substances Hazardous to Health. The Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 2002 (as amended). Approved Code of Practice and Guidance L5. (5th Edition). HSE Books 2005 ISBN 0 7176 2981 3
  • Management of Health and Safety at Work. Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999. Approved Code of Practice and Guidance L21 (Second edition). HAS Books 2000 ISBN 0 7176 2488 9
  • European College of Veterinary Internal Medicine. Preventing occupational and environmental exposure to cytotoxic drugs in veterinary medicine. Sept 2006 http://www.ecvim-ca.org/Documents/oncol2007/Guidelines%20ECVIM%20Hazards%20Cytotoxic%20drugs%202nd%20version%20July%202007.pdf
  • Simon D, Mohring S, Eberle N, Nau H, Nolte I and Hamscher G (2008) Analysis of drug residues in serum and urine of dogs receiving anti-cancer chemotherapy. Proceedings of the First World Veterinary Cancer Congress, Copenhagen, Denmark. pC25
  • Hayes A (2005) Safe use of anticancer chemotherapy in small animal practice. In Practice 27, 118-127.


ADDED