Canis ISSN: 2398-2942

Behavior: management

Synonym(s): Behavioral training; Behavior modification

Contributor(s): Karen Overall, Kersti Seksel

Goals for treatment of behavioral concerns

  • Retention of patient within the household safely, while meeting the patient's welfare and humane care needs.
  • Providing the best possible quality of life (QoL) for all members of the household, given any constraints behavioral treatment may pose.
  • Identification and implementation of a negotiated settlement that accomplishes the above while addressing the patient's and family's concerns. In a negotiated settlement the following factors should be identified:
    • 1. Which aspects of the concern can be changed through avoidance?
    • 2. Which aspects of the concern can be changed through intervention?
    • 3. Which aspects of the concern require risk mitigation, and what plans does this mitigation require?
  • Negotiated settlements can only be created in the context of honest discussion, the first step of which is to learn what the clients want as an outcome. Full disclosure of needs, concerns, fears and annoyances/frustrations is essential because the 'available space' for a negotiated outcome becomes apparent.

The role for accurately identifying behavioral concerns

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The case for avoidance

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The case for intervention

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The case for risk minimization and mitigation

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Arhant C, Bubna-Littitz H, Bartels A, Futschik A, Troxler J (2010) Behaviour of smaller and larger dogs: effects of training methods, inconsistency of owner behaviour and level of engagement in activities with the dog. Appl Anim Behav Sci (123), 131142.
  • Cornelissen J M R, Hopster H (2010) Dog bites in The Netherlands: a study of victims, injuries, circumstances and aggressors to support evaluation of breed specific legislation. Vet J (186), 292-298 PubMed.
  • Hiby E F, Rooney N J, Bradshaw J W S (2004) Dogtraining methods: their use, effectiveness and interaction with behaviour and welfare. Anim Welf (13), 63-69.
  • Pauli A M, Bentley E, Diehl K A, Miller P E (2006) Effects of the application of neck pressure by a collar or harness on intraocular pressure in dogs. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc (42), 207-211 PubMed.
  • Rooney N J, Cowan S (2011) Training methods and owner-dog interactions: links with dog behaviour and learning ability. Appl Anim Behav Sci (132),169-177.

Other sources of information

  • Overall K L (2013) Manual of Clinical Behavioral Medicine for Dogs and Cats, Elsevier, St. Louis.
  • Overall K L (2013) Humane Behavioral Care for Dogs: Problem Prevention and Treatment. DVD. Elsevier, St. Louis.

Organizations

  • American College of Veterinary Behaviorists (ACVB): www.dacvb.org
  • American Veterinary Society of Animal Behavior (AVSAB): www.avsabonline.org.
  • Australian Veterinary Behaviour Interest Group (AVBIG); a special interest group of the Australian Veterinary Association (AVA): www.ava.com.au.
  • Companion Animal Behaviour Therapy Study Group (CABTSG): www.cabtsg.org/(affiliated with the British Small Animal Veterinary Association (BSAVA)).
  • European College of Animal Welfare and Behaviour Medicine - Animal Welfare Science, Ethics and Law (ECAWBM-AWSEL): www.ecawbm.org/.
  • Pet Professional Guild (PPG): www.petprofessionalguild.com.
  • Veterinary Behaviour Chapter of the Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists: www.acvsc.org.au.


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