Canis ISSN: 2398-2942

Vestibular disease: geriatric

Synonym(s): Geriatric vestibular disease; Idiopathic acute peripheral vestibular syndrome

Contributor(s): Laurent Garosi

Introduction

  • Most frequent peripheral vestibular syndrome in older dogs.
  • Signs: acute onset of severe vestibular signs.
  • Diagnosis: negative findings on investigations for other vestibular diseases.
  • Treatment: none.
  • Prognosis: good.
    Follow the diagnostic tree for Vestibular Disease Vestibular Disease.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Unknown.

Predisposing factors

General
  • Age.

Pathophysiology

  • Idiopathic.

Timecourse

  • Acute onset.
  • Stabilizes in a few days.
  • Gradual improvement in a few weeks.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Rossmeisl Jr J H (2010) Vestibular disease in dogs and cats. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract 40 (1), 81-100 PubMed.
  • Thomas W B (2000) Vestibular dysfunction. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract 30 (1), 227-249 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • de Lahunta A, Glass E (2009)Vestibular system - special proprioception.Veterinary Neuroanataomy and Clinical Neurology. 3rd edn. W B Saunders, Elsevier, St Louis, Missouri. pp 319-347.
  • Munana K R (2004)Head tilt and nystagmus.In:BSAVA Manual of Canine and Feline Neurology. 3ed edn. S R Platt & Olby N J (eds). pp 155-171.
  • Bagley R S (2000)Vestibular disease of dogs and cats.In:Current Veterinary Therapy XII.Ed: R W Kirk. Philadelphia: W B Saunders. pp 966-971.


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