Canis ISSN: 2398-2942

Urethra: neoplasia

Contributor(s): Phil Nicholls

Introduction

  • Uncommon, most frequent in female.
  • Cause: usually transitional cell carcinoma.
  • Signs: urinary frequency increased - mild incontinence to severe urinary retention.
  • Diagnosis: signs, radiography.
  • Treatment: most are not treatable (except distal urethra in male: amputation and urethrostomy).
  • Prognosis: poor.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Transitional cell carcinoma.
  • Squamous cell carcinoma.
  • Adenocarcinoma.
  • Undifferentiated carcinoma.

Pathophysiology

Timecourse

  • Months.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Valli V E et al (1995) Pathology of canine bladder and urethral cancer and correlation with tumour progression and survival. J Comp Pathol 113 (2), 113-130 PubMed.
  • Norris A M et al (1992) Canine bladder and urethral tumours - a retrospective study of 115 cases (1980-1985). J Vet Intern Med (3), 145-153 PubMed.


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