Canis ISSN: 2398-2942

Tularemia

Contributor(s): Susan Dawson, Rhea Morgan

Introduction

  • Zoonotic disease that can infect many domestic and wild animals, including dogs, cats and rabbits.
  • Caused by Francisella tularensis Francisella tularensis , a gram-negative, non-spore forming bacteria.

Pathogenesis

Pathophysiology

  • Bacteria multiply within macrophages.
  • Capillary endothelium becomes damaged and necrotic foci develop in:
    • Liver.
    • Spleen.
    • Lungs.
    • Lymph nodes.

Epidemiology

  • Due to tick transmission human cases have a peak incidence from May to August. A similar incidence pattern may be noted in animals.

Diagnosis

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Treatment

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Prevention

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Feldman, A (2003) Tularaemia. JAVMA 222 (6), 725-730 PubMed.
  • Gustafson W & DeBowes J (1996) Tularaemia in a dog. J Anim Hosp Assoc 32 (4), 339-341 VetMedResource.
  • Rohrbach B W (1988) Tularemia. JAVMA 193 (4), 428-432 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Kaufman K A (1998) Tularaemia. In: Greene C E Infectious diseases of the Dog and Cat. 2nd edition, WB Saunders.
  • Jellison W L (1974) Tularemia in North America. University of Montana Press, Missoula MT.


ADDED