ISSN 2398-2969      

Testicle: sertoli cell tumor

icanis
Contributor(s):

Daniel Smeak


Introduction

  • Average age 8-10 years (younger in cryptorchids).
  • About 25% estrogenic.
  • Cryptorchidism predisposes to Sertoli cell tumor (SCT). (Account for 60% of cryptorchid testicular neoplasia.)
  • 10% malignancy.
  • Signs: often large, slow growing, irregular, bulging.
  • Treatment: bilateral orchidectomy.
  • Prognosis: good if tumor removed before metastasizes; better prognosis for scrotal testicle.

Pathogenesis

Pathophysiology

  • About 25% estrogenic, especially if retained. (About 10-15% have blood dyscrasia).
  • Incidence greatest in right testicle (cf cryptorchidism).
  • 10% malignancy - metastasis to iliac, sublumbar, inguinal nodes. Distant metastasis predominantly abdominal to liver, lungs, kidney, spleen, pancreas.
  • Usually slow growing.

Timecourse

  • Months to years.
  • Primary tumor may be palpated on routine clinical examination.
  • May present with anemia associated with estrogenic effect.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Prevention

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Nuttall T (1998) What is your diagnosis? Sertoli cell tumor. JSAP 39 (11), 509, 546 PubMed.
  • Looijenga L H et al (1994) Seminomas of the canine testis. Counterpart of spermatocytic seminoma of men? Lab Invest 71 (4), 490-496 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Flanders J A, Schlafer D H & Yeager A E (2000)diseases of the canine testis.In:Current Veterinary Therapy XIII.Ed: J Bonagura. pp 941-947.

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