ISSN 2398-2969      

Temporomandibular joint: luxation

icanis
Contributor(s):

Alexander M Reiter

Synonym(s): TMJ luxation


Introduction

  • Cause: head trauma.
  • Signs: inability to fully close mouth due to contact between the maxillary and mandibular teeth; displacement of the lower jaw to one side.
  • Diagnosis: history of trauma; clinical signs, diagnostic imaging showing the mandibular condyle out of its mandibular fossa.
  • Treatment: manual or surgical reduction of the mandibular condyle back to its mandibular fossa; tape muzzle for several weeks to reduce the likelihood of repeated displacement of the mandibular condyle.
  • Prognosis: good to excellent.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

Predisposing factors

  • Decreased mandibular symphyseal movement and shorter jaw length.

Pathophysiology

  • Subluxation: mandibular condyle is minimally displaced but still situated in its mandibular fossa.
  • Luxation:
    • Rostrodorsal displacement (much more common) of the mandibular condyle results in displacement of the lower jaw to the contralateral side and contact between maxillary and mandibular teeth on the contralateral side.
    • Caudoventral displacement (rare) of the mandibular condyle is rare and usually only possible after fracture of the retroarticular process.

Diagnosis

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to obtain ten tokens to view any ten Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds or videos, or Login

Treatment

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to obtain ten tokens to view any ten Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds or videos, or Login

Prevention

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to obtain ten tokens to view any ten Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds or videos, or Login

Outcomes

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to obtain ten tokens to view any ten Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds or videos, or Login

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Reiter A M (2004) Symphysiotomy, symphysiectomy, and intermandibular arthrodesis in a cat with open-mouth jaw locking: case report and literature review. Journal of Veterinary Dentistry 21 (3), 147-158 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Lantz G C, Verstraete F J M (2012) Fractures and luxations involving the temporomandibular joint. In: Verstraete F J M, Lomer M J (eds): Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery in Dogs and Cats. Philadelphia, WB Saunders, pp 321-332.

Can’t find what you’re looking for?

We have an ever growing content library on Vetlexicon so if you ever find we haven't covered something that you need please fill in the form below and let us know!

 
 
 
 

To show you are not a Bot please can you enter the number showing adjacent to this field

 Security code