Canis ISSN: 2398-2942

Skin: pediculosis

Synonym(s): Louse, lice infestation

Contributor(s): Rosanna Marsella, David Scarff

Introduction

  • Cause: infestation with biting louseTrichodectes canis Trichodectes canis (common) or sucking louseLinognathus setosus Linognathus setosus (rarer); associated with poor husbandry.
  • Signs: pruritus, scale, anemia (heavy infestation ofLinognathus).
  • Diagnosis: pruritus, scaling.
  • Treatment: most antiparasitic agents are effective.
  • Prognosis: excellent.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

Predisposing factors

General
  • Poor husbandry.
  • Debilitation/old age.
  • Young puppies.

Pathophysiology

  • Trichodectes canis(biting louse) feeds on skin surface → scale and alopecia.
  • Linognathus setosus(sucking louse) sucks blood and can → anemia.

Epidemiology

  • Obligate parasites, eggs cemented to hair shaft.
  • Transmitted by direct contact and fomites.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Prevention

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Hanssen I et al (1999) Field study on the insecticidal efficacy of Advantage against natural infestations of dogs with lice. Parasitol Res 85 (4), 347-348 PubMed.
  • Cooper P R & Penaliggon J (1996) Use of fipronil to eliminate recurrent infestation by Trichodectes canis in a pack of bloodhounds. Vet Rec 139 (4), 95 PubMed.
  • Sutherland I H (1990) Veterinary use of ivermectin. Acta Leiden 59 (1-2), 211-216 PubMed.


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