ISSN 2398-2969      

Shoulder: luxation - congenital

icanis
Contributor(s):

Rob Pettitt


Introduction

  • Rare, congenital.
  • Signs: recurrent lameness (uni- or bi-lateral) between 3-10 months old.
  • Begging posture.
  • Better hindquarter development - may attempt to walk upright on hindlimbs.
  • Treatment: conservative.
  • Diagnosis: signs, radiography.
  • Prognosis: fair - lameness may improve with age.
  • Breed predilection (toy poodle and sheltie breeds) for medial luxations without trauma.

Pathogenesis

Pathophysiology

  • Congenital abnormality of scapulohumeral joint.
  • Flattened or convex glenoid and relatively large humeral head.
  • Acromion most commonly displaced laterally, ie medial luxation.
  • May be bilateral.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Read R A (1994) Successful treatment of congenital shoulder luxation by closed pinning. VCOT 7 (4), 170-172 VetMedResource.
  • Vasseur P B (1990) Arthrodesis for congenital shoulder luxation in a dog. JAVMA 197 (4), 501-503 PubMed.
  • Campbell J R (1968) Shoulder lameness in the dog. JSAP (4), 189-192 PubMed.
  • Vaughan L C (1967) Dislocation of the shoulder joint of the dog and cat. JSAP (1), 45-50 PubMed.

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