Canis ISSN: 2398-2942

Sensory neuropathies

Synonym(s): Sensory neuropathies

Contributor(s): Kyle Braund, Laurent Garosi

Introduction

  • Sensory neuropathy in which the cell populations in the ganglia are reduced or in which underlying pathogenetic lesions are believed to exist/begin.
  • Includes sensory ganglioradiculitis, sensory neuropathy in the Pointer, sensory trigeminal neuropathy Trigeminal neuropathies , sensory neuropathy in Boxers (progressive axonopathy) Progressive axonopathy of the Boxer , sensory neuropathy in long-haired Dachshunds Sensory neuropathy: Dachshund , sensory neuropathy in Jack Russell Terrier, sensory neuropathy in Golden Retriever, sensory neuropathy in Doberman Pinscher, sensory neuropathy in Scottish Terrier, sensory neuropathy in Siberian Husky, sensory neuropathy in Whippet.
  • Signs: loss of skin sensation or pain, ataxia, depressed spinal reflexes, without muscle weakness, +/- self-mutilation, +/- urinary and fecal incontinence.
  • Diagnosis: signs; electrodiagnostic (EMG, motor/sensory NCV).
  • Treatment: none, symptomatic management.
  • Prognosis: guarded to poor.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Autosomal recessive (in Pointer, Boxer, +/- Long-haired Dachshund ).

Predisposing factors

General
  • Presently unknown.

Specific

  • Presently unknown.

Pathophysiology

  • Degeneration or death of neuronal cell bodies in the sensory ganglia. A deficiency in growth and/or differentiation of primary sensory neurons may be involved. In English Pointers Pointer , there is loss of substance P, an excitatory agent that mediates nociception, ie pain sensation.
  • Degeneration or death of neuronal cell bodies in the sensory ganglia → abnormal sensation or loss of sensation in the areas innervated by affected nerves → loss of proprioceptive reactions and reflexes due to loss of sensory afferent → ataxia due to proprioceptive deficits.
  • Self-mutilation due to abnormal sensation.

Timecourse

  • Varies depending on individual entity.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Prevention

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Braund K G (1996) Degenerative causes of neuropathies in dogs and cats. Vet Med 91 (8), 722-739 VetMedResource.
  • Jeffrey N D et al (1993) Sensory neuronopathy of possible toxic etiology in a dog. Prog Vet Neurol (4), 145-148 PubMed.
  • Palmer A C, Blakemore W F (1988) Progressive neuropathy in the cairn terrier. Vet Rec 123 (1), 39 VetMedResource.
  • Steiss J E et al (1987) Sensory neuropathy in a dog. JAVMA 190 (2), 205-208 VetMedResource.
  • Wouda W et al (1983) Sensory neuropathy in dogs - a study of four cases. J Comp Pathol 93 (3), 437-450 VetMedResource.

Other sources of information

  • Duncan I D & Ardden P A (1989)Sensory neuropathy.In: Kirk R W (ed)Current Veterinary Therapy IX, W B Saunders, Philadelphia. pp 822-827.


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