Canis ISSN: 2398-2942

Salivary gland: neoplasia

Contributor(s): Rosa Ragni

Introduction

  • Unusual - adenocarcinoma most common type.
  • Signs:
    EitherFirm discrete enlargement of one of major salivary glands/occasionally with associated mucocele.
    OrDiffuse thickened infiltration of oral mucosa developing from one of the minor glands.
  • Diagnosis: histopathology.
  • Treatment: surgical resection if possible.
  • Prognosis: guarded, risk of metastasis and local recurrence. In addition, adjacent neurovascular structures may be damaged.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

Pathophysiology

  • Usually primary tumors but metastasize to local lymph nodes readily.
  • Distant metastases (lungs/bone) possible.

Timecourse

  • Weeks to months.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Hammer A et al (2001) Salivary gland neoplasia in the dog and cat: survival times and prognostic factors. JAAHA 37 (5), 478-482 PubMed.
  • Carberry C A, Flander J A, Harvey H J & Ryan A M (1988) Salivary gland tumors in dogs and cats - a literature and case review. JAAHA 24 (5), 561-7 VetMedResource.

Other sources of information

  • Dunning D (2003)Oral cavity: tongue, lips, cheeks, pharynx, and salivary glands.In:Textbook of Small Animal Surgery. 3rd edn. Slatter D (ed), W B Saunders, Philadelphia, pp 553-561.
  • Hedlund C S (2002)Surgery of the oral cavity and oropharynx.In:Small Animal Surgery.2nd edn, T W Fossum (ed), Mosby, St. Louis, pp 274-307.
  • Knecht C D (1998)Salivary glands.In:Current techniques in Small Animal Surgery.4th edn, Bojrab M J (ed), Williams and Wilkins, Baltimore, pp183-186.


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