Canis ISSN: 2398-2942

Rectum: stricture

Contributor(s): James Simpson

Introduction

  • Decrease in size of rectal lumen either following trauma - fibrous tissue formation or neoplasia.
  • Cause: anorectal abscesses, accidental or surgical trauma, chronic proctitis, neoplasia, idiopathic.
  • Signs: various degrees of fecal tenesmus, a thin ribbon-type stool, dyschezia, hematochezia, constipation → megacolon, and possibly fecal incontinence.
  • Diagnosis: clinical signs, rectal palpation revealing a constricted area of the rectum that will not relax when the animal is under anesthesia, biopsy to check for neoplasia.
  • Treatment: either dietary management and bougienage or dilatation, or surgery.
  • Prognosis: recurrence of rectal stricture is always possible.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Anorectal abscesses.
  • Accidental or surgical trauma.
  • Chronic proctitis.
  • Neoplasia.

Pathophysiology

  • Any disease or trauma that evokes an inflammatory response in the anorectal region can cause scar tissue to form that is often a constricting ring of tissue.
  • Neoplasia (carcinoma) is rare but may cause a similar annular type stricture of the distal colon or rectum.
  • If the inflammatory response and subsequent fibrosis incorporates the anal sphincter musculature or associated nerves, fecal incontinence may result.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Knottenbelt C M, Simpson J W, Taylor S, Ridyard A, Chandler M, Jamieson P & Welsh E (2000) Preliminary clinical observations on the use of pyroxicam in the management of rectal tubular papillary polyps. JSAP 41 (9), 393-397 PubMed.
  • Simpson J W (1996) Differential diagnosis of faecal tenesmus in dogs. In Practice 18 (6), 280-287 VetMedResource.

Other sources of information

  • Seim H B (1986)diseases of the rectum and anus.In:Current Veterinary Therapy XI, W B Saunders, Philadelphia. pp 916-921.


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