Canis ISSN: 2398-2942

Penis: squamous cell carcinoma

Contributor(s):

Introduction

  • Occasionally old dogs.
  • Very rare overall.
  • Signs: hematuria, penile bleeding, dysuria or stranguria.
  • Prognosis: usually slow-growing and slow to metastasize.
  • Treatment: radical amputation with urethrostomy if necessary.

Pathogenesis

Pathophysiology

  • Often present as indurating ulceration of glans.
  • May be difficult to discern in early stages.
  • Usually slow growing.
  • Usually slow to metastasize to inguinal nodes.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Patnaik A K (1988) Two cases of canine penile neoplasm - Squamous cell carcinoma and mesenchymal chondrosarcoma. 24 (4), 403-406 VetMedResource.


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