Canis ISSN: 2398-2942

Mesothelioma

Introduction

  • Rare, highly effusive tumor of epithelial lining of body cavities.
  • Signs: hemorrhagic effusion, dyspnea, exercise intolerance, mediastinal mass.
  • Diagnosis: radiography/ultrasonography, histopathology.
  • Treatment: chemotherapy.
  • Prognosis: guarded - some animals respond well to chemotherapy.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Exposure to asbestos?

Pathophysiology

  • Neoplastic cells of epithelial lining of body cavities produce an effusion resulting in various symptoms dependent on site.
  • Most common sites: pleura, pericardium, abdominal peritoneum, vaginal tunic of scrotum.
  • Neoplastic epithelial cells → effusion → impingement on organs → abnormal function, eg dyspnea, exercise intolerance, vomiting.
  • Neoplastic cells → mediastinal mass.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Prevention

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Stepien R L, Whitley N T & Dubielzig R R (2000) Idiopathic or mesothelioma-related pericardial effusion - clinical findings and survival in 17 dogs studied retrospectively. JSAP 41 (8), 342-7 PubMed.
  • Closa J M, Font A & Mascort J (1999) Pericardial mesothelioma in a dog - long term survival after pericardiectomy in combination with chemotherapy. JSAP 40 (8), 383-386 PubMed.


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