Canis ISSN: 2398-2942

Lung: pulmonary neoplasia

Contributor(s): Lynelle Johnson

Introduction

  • May be generalized or diffuse.
  • Cause: primary or secondary neoplasia.
  • Signs: cough, exercise intolerance, other signs of neoplastic disease.
  • Diagnosis: radiography, histopathology.
  • Treatment: surgical excision, chemotherapy.
  • Prognosis: guarded - depends on tumor type.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Carcinomas are most common:
    • Bronchogenic.
    • Squamous cell.
    • Bronchoalveolar.
  • Sarcomas rare as primary disease:
    • Lymphosarcoma.
    • Hemangiosarcoma.
    • Fibrosarcoma.
    • Osteosarcoma.
  • Metastatic disease (more common than primary tumors) :
    • Mammary carcinoma.
    • Hemangiosarcoma.
    • Thyroid tumor.
    • Melanoma.
    • Osteosarcoma.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • McNiel E A, Ogilvie G K, Powers B E et al (1997) Evaluation of prognostic factors for dogs with primary lung tumors 67 cases (1985 - 1992). JAVMA 211 (11), 1422-1427 PubMed.
  • Ogilvie G K, Weigel R M, Haschek W M et al (1989) Prognostic factors for tumor remission and survival in dogs after surgery for primary lung tumors 76 cases (1975-1985). JAVMA 195 (1), 109-12 PubMed.
  • Ogilvie G K, Hashek W M, Withrow S J et al (1989) Classification of primary lung tumors in dogs - 210 cases (1975-1985). JAVMA 195 (1), 106-8 PubMed.
  • Mehlhaff C J, Mooney S (1985) Primary pulmonary neoplasia in the dog and cat. VCNA 15 (5), 1061-7 PubMed.


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