Canis ISSN: 2398-2942

Hip: luxation

Contributor(s): Joseph Harari

Introduction

  • Most common joint luxation.
  • Direction of luxation: craniodorsal (most common), caudodorsal, ventral (least common).
  • Cause: relatively severe trauma, spontaneously if pre-existing hip dysplasia.
  • Signs: non-weightbearing hindlimb lameness, characteristic leg carriage.
  • Treatment: open or closed reduction.
  • Prognosis: guarded if pre-existing degenerative joint disease (DJD) or hip dysplasia; good otherwise.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Relatively severe trauma.

Predisposing factors

General

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Evers B (1997) Long-term results of treatment of traumatic coxofemoral joint dislocation in dogs. JAVMA 210 (1), 59-64 PubMed.


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