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Exercise-induced collapse (Labrador)

icanis

Synonym(s): Exercise-induced weakness in Labrador retriever; EIC


Introduction

  • Cause: autosomal recessive inherited disorder.
  • Signs: weakness and collapse during strenuous exercise in otherwise normal Labrador retrievers.
  • Diagnosis: DNA testing showing two-copies of Dynamin 1 (DNM1) mutation.
  • Treatment: avoiding trigger activities.
  • Prognosis: frequency of episodes tends to become less frequent with age. Rarely fatal. Most dogs can live normal active lives if specific trigger activities are avoided or done in moderation.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Mutation of the Dynamin 1 gene (DNM1) has been associated with the syndrome of exercise-induced collapse.
  • DNM1 mutation observed in Labrador Retrievers, Chesapeake Bay Retrievers, Curly-coated Retrievers, Welsh Pembroke Corgis, Boykin spaniels and mixed breed dogs thought to be Labrador retriever crosses.
  • Clinical signs are observed in dogs homozygous for the mutation.
  • 30-40% of pure Labrador Retrievers have been noted as carriers of the mutation with any clinical importance.
  • DNM1 mutation was not identified in Golden, Flat-coated, or Nova Scotia duck tolling retrievers, or 15 other non-retrieving breeds tested.

Predisposing factors

General
  • Dog homozygous for a mutation in the dynamin 1 gene are at risk for collapse when exposed to high-intensity exercise with associated high level of excitement or stress.
  • Increased ambient temperature and humidity seem to increase risk of collapse in homozygous dog.

Pathophysiology

  • Dynamin 1 gene is responsible for a molecule essential in synaptic vesicle endocytosis in the brain and spinal cord during high-level neuronal activity.
  • DNM1 mutation associated with EIC has its most profound effect on DNM1 function when body temperature is elevated as normally occurs with exercise.

Timecourse

  • Weakness and collapse occur after 5 to 20 minutes of strenuous exercise.
  • Complete recovery occurs within 5 to 30 minutes.

Epidemiology

  • Frequency of DNM1 mutant allele carriers in Labrador retrievers form conformation show, field trial/hunt test, pet or service line ranges from 17.9% to 38%.
  • Frequency of homozygous mutant individuals ranges from 1.8% to 13.6%. 83.6% of these homozygous mutant individuals were reported to have collapsed by 4 years of age (Minor K Met al, 2011).
  • DNM1 homozygous mutant genotype is not completely penetrant.
  • Dynamin 1-associated exercise-induced collapse is a widespread health concern in several very popular breeds, as well as breeds whose genetic similarity to retrievers is not obvious.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Prevention

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Minor K M et al (2011) Presence and impact of the exercise-induced collapse associated DNM1 mutation in Labrador retrievers and other breeds. Vet J 189, 214-219 PubMed.
  • Taylor S M et al (2009) Evaluations of Labrador retrievers with exercise-induced collapse, including response to a standardized strenuous exercise protocol. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 45, 3-13 PubMed.
  • Paterson E E et al (2008) A canine DNM1 mutation is highly associated with the syndrome of exercise-induced collapse. Nature Genetics 40, 1235-1239 PubMed.
  • Taylor S M et al (2008) Exercise-induced collapse in Labrador retrievers: survey results and preliminary investigation of heritability. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 44, 295-301 PubMed.
  • Steiss J et al (2004) Physiologic responses in healthy Labradors Retrievers during field trial training and competition. J Vet Intern Med 18, 147-151 PubMed.

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